Strange wording in Our Father?/ Sausage on Ash Wednesday?

Posted June 8, 2018 at 7:00 am

Q For years I had been puzzled by the words “lead us not into temptation” in the Our Father. It always seemed to me unlikely that God would do that, and I wondered whether the phrase had been mistranslated. Now that Pope Francis has agreed that this wording is strange, I wonder if something like “leave us not in temptation but deliver us from evil” would be more correct. (Crozet, Virginia)

A You should be credited for having seen the difficulty. (Many people, I’m afraid, have prayed the Our Father for years without reflecting on that phrase, without seeing a problem.) And now you have Pope Francis in your corner. In December 2017, in a series of televised conversations about the Lord’s Prayer with an Italian Catholic prison chaplain, the pope said, “It’s not (God) who pushes me into temptation to see how I fall. … The one who

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    Carville.pdf

    The church, institution or people?

    About a month ago I was at my brother’s house for a gathering of friends and relatives. After about 8 p.m., most of the guests were gone, leaving only the two of us, my sister-in-law, and a couple from out of town who are close friends to the three of us and who were spending the night. We began talking about the younger generation’s attitudes towards the Catholic faith. Before we realized it, the clock was showing midnight. Apparently parents as well as priests are very bewildered by what

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    Robinson, Brett Guest.pdf

    Yanny vs. laurel

    Our senses often deceive us. The recent “yanny vs. laurel” debate on the internet saw those who heard the word “laurel” arguing with those who heard the word “yanny” when listening to a vocabulary.com recording of the word “laurel.”

    Very reasonable people had rather intense disagreements about what they were hearing. (I heard “laurel” and my son heard “yanny.” We simply had to agree to disagree.)

    It may seem like a trivial dispute,

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    Rolheiser.pdf

    Mercy, truth, and pastoral practice

    Recently a student I’d taught decades ago made this comment to me: “It’s been more than 20 years since I took your class and I’ve forgotten most everything you taught. What I do remember from your class is that we’re supposed to always try not to make God look stupid.”

    I hope that’s true. I hope that’s something people take away from my lectures and writings because I believe that the first task of any Christian apologetics is to rescue God from

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    ‘Substitute godmother’ needed?/ Response to helping beggars

    With Father Kenneth Doyle

    Q In 1995, I was godmother at the baptism of my brother’s daughter. A few years later, it turned out that I adopted her and have raised her as my own. (She is now 27.) Then, in 2010, I served as godmother for my sister’s daughter and, the following year, wound up taking custody of her as well and eventually adopting her. (She is making her first Communion this month.)

    I took my role as godmother very seriously,  sending both girls to Catholic schools,  but it seems that they’ve been “cheated” out of having godmothers.

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    My Favorite Things

    Darryl Ducote

    During the annual Spring Luncheon held recently for employees at the Catholic Life Center, Darryl Ducote, director of the Office of Marriage and Family Department for the Diocese of Baton Rouge, and Joe Bass, youth ministry project coordinator for the diocese, sang a song they had penned specially for Bishop Robert W. Muench. The song was sung to the tune of “My Favorite Things” from the popular musical “The Sound of Music.”

     

    Joseph Bass

     

    Below is the song:

    Rich, creamy chocolate
    And seafood au gratin,
    Pasta with meatballs
    That

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    No simple solution

    By Father Jeff Bayhi
    Once again, we watch in horror as we listen to the heartbreaking details of another school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas (May 19). Long before the victims of this tragedy will be laid to rest, the theories of what the solution will be emerge, and the blame game will surface. The first will obviously be the legality of guns, the second will be ideas of providing school safety and the problem of mental illness will also be in the mix.
    Unfortunately, the reality that the lack of a safe environment exists long before our children leave home

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    Come, Holy Spirit, come! 

    By Father John Carville

    On Pentecost Sunday we sing, “Come Holy Spirit, Come,” sometimes in Latin (Veni, Creator Spiritus), asking God to send us his Spirit as he sent it upon the apostles and disciples.  The first reading from the Mass says, “All were filled with the Holy Spirit.  They began to express themselves in foreign tongues and make bold proclamation as the Spirit prompted them.”  This is the culmination of the Christ event, the fulfillment of Jesus’ mission on earth.  He promised us that he would be with us until the end of the ages,

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    Doyle.pdf

    When incense is bothersome/ Giving beggars money

     On the feast of the Epiphany, I left Mass coughing and with a headache due to the large amount of incense used. I spoke to the celebrant after Mass, and he told me that the incense was part of the Mass and that I would just have to get used to it. I also talked to our pastor, but he offered no solution.  

    Again, at Easter Mass, I was not able to tolerate the incense. Because I

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    Carville.pdf

    For the love of Alfie

    Our world is getting quickly smaller as our technology gets more sophisticated and dominating. The week I am writing this has been hectic with meetings and phone calls in preparation for a seminar to be given by a panel from Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center to a class of LSU law students. The seminar will be about case studies in medical ethics with emphasis on end of life issues. Panelists will be Coletta Barrett, Vice President of Mission at OLOL, James Reagan, Senior Bioethicist at

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    Rolheiser.pdf

    The shortcomings of a digital immigrant

    Information technology and social media aren’t my mother tongue. I’m a digital immigrant. I wasn’t born into the world of information technology but migrated into it, piece-meal. I first lived in some foreign territories.  

    I was nine years old before I lived with electricity. I had seen it before; but neither our home, our school, nor our neighbors had electricity. Electricity, when I first saw it, was a huge revelation. And while I

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    Robinson, Brett Guest.pdf

    At the marketplace of culture

    Attempts to evangelize online are not wrong, but the venue is not ideal.

    When St. Paul arrived in Athens, he spent most of his time debating the philosophers and citizens in the marketplace. But then, Scripture tells us, they brought him to the Areopagus.

    The Areopagus was set aside from the noise of the marketplace. It was made up of a council of elders who heard the most important arguments regarding serious crimes and matters of

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    Doyle.pdf

    Pope Francis and hell/ Divorced, remarried sponsor for confirmation?

    Q Did Pope Francis just say that there is no hell? (Chesapeake, Virginia)  

    A No. Pope Francis did not say that there is no hell. That misinformation comes from a March 2018 article in the Italian newspaper La Repubblica. The article written by that newspaper’s co-founder and former editor, Eugenio Scalfari claimed that the pope had told Scalfari in a recent conversation that “the souls of those who are unrepentant, and thus cannot be forgiven, disappear” and that “hell does not exist; the

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    Carville.pdf

    Pope Francis’ new exhortation is a must read

    Pope Francis has just published a new exhortation on the call to holiness. Its Latin name is Gaudete et Exsultate (Rejoice and Exult). Massimo Faggioli, Roman journalist and correspondent for National Catholic Reporter, calls it the “most important magisterial text on holiness since Vatican II’s Lumen Gentium (The Constitution on the Church). That may be a stretch, but Gaudete et Exsultate is very good, a must read.

    “My modest goal,” says Pope Francis, “is to repropose the call to holiness in a

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    Rolheiser.pdf

    Moral outrage

    Moral outrage is the antithesis of morality. Yet it’s everywhere present in our world today and is everywhere rationalized on the basis of God and truth.

    We live in a world awash in moral outrage. Everywhere individuals and groups are indignant and morally outraged, sometimes violently so, by opposing individuals, groups, ideologies, moral positions, ecclesiologies, interpretations of religion, interpretations of Scripture and the like. We see this everywhere, television networks outraged at the news coverage of other networks, church groups bitterly demonizing

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    Catoir.pdf

    Pope Francis

    Pope Francis has my admiration because I hear the voice of love speaking through him. He always stresses God’s infinite mercy.

    Recently, a 93-year-old atheist accused him of denying the existence of hell. This man, who has nothing but contempt for Christianity, delighted in causing an uproar. The pope denied his claim as a bogus reconstruction of what he misheard. The pope’s denial is good enough for me.

    One thing is certain from what

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    Doyle.pdf

    Not feeling God’s forgiveness/Stephen Hawking and the pope

    Q I confessed a grave sin more than 40 years ago and received absolution for it. I have, however, been haunted by this over the years and still feel guilt. My sin was that I had taken my 16-year-old daughter to our family doctor to have an abortion. So I not only committed a serious sin myself but caused her to do the same.  

    We both confessed these sins to our priest. But now I continue to be plagued by that memory. Am

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    Carville.pdf

    The Last Supper is a year-long meal

    Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday are the high holy days of the Catholic liturgical year. They are more important than Christmas or Ascension or Pentecost or Trinity Sunday, St. Patrick’s Day, St. Joseph’s Day or Ash Wednesday, even if Ash Wednesday for some reason seems to draw the highest church attendance. Sunday Masses and, to some extent weekday Masses too, are extensions of what happened on Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday. Jesus Christ, the son of God, took on our flesh to prove God’s

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    Rolheiser.pdf

    When time stands still

    The theory of relativity tells us that space and time are not what they appear to be. They’re relative, meaning that they don’t always function in the same way and they aren’t always experienced in the same way. Time can stand still. 

    Or can it? This side of eternity, it would seem not. Ever since the universe started with a mammoth explosion some 13.8 billion years ago the clock has been running non-stop, like a merciless meter, moving relentlessly forwards. 

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    Fanucci, Laura-FAITH AT HOME.pdf

    Sweet spots and sacrifices

    I have no business singing high C.

    The second a hymn starts, I can tell by the notes whether the song’s range is in my comfort zone.
    Solidly alto, I am happiest singing F, G and A above middle C.

    But B thins out, C stretches and D screeches. (I don’t even attempt E – leave that to the sopranos.)

    Yet when I’m tempted to

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    Carville.pdf

    Suffering’s answer is on the cross

    Human suffering is always a mystery. We fear it. We do what we can to prevent it. We pray to avoid it. But we never completely escape it. This Lent has been filled with it. School killings, acts of terrorism, threats of war, an increase of murders, even an increase of funerals of people we loved, some in old age, but others long before we expected to lose them. We have this natural, God-given, holy desire to live. Yet so many die before their time. We are left

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    Meek color.pdf

    Don’t let the joke be on you Easter Sunday

    Many years ago, as the story goes, even long before this aging scribe had spliced his first comma, a man walked among the people, proclaiming not to be a prophet but a teacher and a savior.

    He healed the sick, fed the hungry, performed countless miracles including raising the dead and attracted large crowds, preaching with a maturity that amazed even some of his most ardent detractors.

    Eventually, he was crucified by his own

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    Rolheiser.pdf

    Our need to pray

    “Unless you somehow have a foot outside of your culture, the culture will swallow you whole.” 

    Daniel Berrigan wrote that and it’s true too in this sense: Unless you can drink in strength from a source outside yourself, your natural proclivities for paranoia, bitterness and hatred will invariably swallow you whole. 

    The disciples in St. Luke’s Gospel understood this. They approached Jesus and asked him to teach them how to pray because they saw him doing things that

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    Doyle.pdf

    Beatitudes and DACA/ Cremation and relics/ Auctioning off pews

    Q Recently I read an article in a Catholic magazine that suggested that, in addition to the Ten Commandments, we should use the beatitudes when examining our conscience before going to confession. This sent me into a tailspin, and I had to go and review the beatitudes to see if I even remembered them all. 

    I’m afraid that I am in violation of several of the beatitudes because of my views on DACA the call to be merciful, for example, or to “hunger

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    Rolheiser.pdf

    Our ache for earthly immortality

    We share the world with more than seven and a half billion people and each of us has the irrepressible, innate sense that we are special and uniquely destined. This isn’t surprising since each one of us is indeed unique and special. But how does one feel special among seven and half billion others? 

    We try to stand out. Generally we don’t succeed, and so, as Allan Jones puts it, “We nurse within our hearts the hope that we are different, that we

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    Catoir.pdf

    Letting love in during Lent

    My love goes out to all of you this holy season of
    Lent. Now that I am an old man, I see more clearly
    that love is the only thing that really matters in life.
    Things you have acquired, like wealth or power or
    fame, are not really important. All that matters is
    how much of God’s love you’ve shared with those in need.

    Every Lent we celebrate God’s gifts, especially the gift of eternal life. We aspire to attain heaven by striving for greater perfection. As

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    Doyle.pdf

    Ashes for a Protestant?/ Early life of Jesus

    My wife is Catholic and I am Methodist. We were married 35 years ago in a Catholic church, and we raised our children as Catholic, including Catholic schools. We attend our Catholic parish regularly. I respect the rules of the Catholic Church regarding my not being allowed to receive Communion as a non-Catholic.

    But we recently attended Ash Wednesday services at the parish, and I was wondering whether you had to be a Catholic to receive the ashes, or is the rule the

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    Carville.pdf

    The ‘Dreamers’ are a moral issue

    The “Dreamers” have escaped deportation for the time being. However, they are still in legal limbo until Congress decides to legalize them by some law. That seems to be what President Donald Trump wants, provided he can leverage them to get funding to build the wall across our southern border that he promised his voter base when running for election. These kinds of issues we have become used to in the first year of the Trump presidency. But never, except perhaps on the abortion issue, has a political decision

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    Carville.pdf

    Lent, a time to get rid of our illusions

    In Louisiana we know how to prepare for Lent. We call it Mardi Gras. We take all of our most grandiose ideas and dress up as our wildest fantasies of who we would like to be. The costumes are always gaudy, but often beautifully so. Then we climb up on floats and parade through the streets of our towns and cities pretending to be royalty while we throw beads and trinkets to our adoring subjects. It is fun to be king, queen and court for a day. It

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    Rolheiser.pdf

    Our most common sin

    Classically Christianity has listed seven sins as “deadly” sins, meaning that most everything else we do which is not virtuous somehow takes its root in one these congenital propensities. These are the infamous seven: pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath and sloth. 

    In spiritual literature the first three, pride, greed and lust get most of the ink and attention. Pride is presented as the root of all sin, Lucifer’s primordial defiance of God as forever echoed in our own lives: I will not

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