Caldarola.pdf

A moral duty to serve refugees

Posted July 7, 2017 at 12:00 am

Imagine that you are languishing in a foreign jail alone. You don’t know a soul in this strange country. 

If you return to the homeland from which you have escaped, your life is in immediate danger. Your wife and children have fled to yet another foreign country, and you wonder when or if you will ever see them again.

Hoping to be granted asylum, you exist in limbo in a cell, waiting, frightened and solitary, for the labyrinthine legal system to chew you up and eventually spit you out.

This is the reality for many undocumented individuals in the U.S.

And this is where my friend Ruth comes in. Not wearing a hero’s cape,

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    Doyle.pdf

    No heaven?/A vengeful God?

    Q I am 86 years old. I was baptized as a child, educated for 12 years in Catholic schools and am still a regularly practicing Catholic. Some weeks ago, I read a column of yours that absolutely floored me and my family as well.

    Since I was very young, I have always been taught to believe that St. Peter is at the “Golden Gate” to meet us, but you say that there is no “specific” heaven. Then what have we been aspiring

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    Carville.pdf

    Eucharist, the center of our faith

    There is a very old saying, centuries old, that in Latin goes “Lex orandi, lex credendi.” It translates literally, “The law of praying (is) the law of believing.” Its full meaning is that our church’s official prayer in the liturgy of the Mass and the sacraments is a true guide to our faith, our belief. Last month on June 18 we celebrated the feast of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ which commemorates the institution of the Mass, the eucharistic celebration of the Last Supper, by

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    Rolheiser.pdf

    To whom can we go?

    “To whom else shall we go? You have the message of eternal life.”

    St. Peter says these words to Jesus. But they are spoken in a very conflicted context: Jesus had just said something that upset and offended his audience and the Gospels tell us that everyone walked away grumbling that what Jesus was teaching was “intolerable.” Jesus then turns to his apostles and asks them: “Do you want to walk away too?” St. Peter answers: “To whom else can we go?”

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    Doyle.pdf

    Cellphones revisited/ Conversion before marriage? / Dementia and holy Communion

    Q Recently a reader complained about irreverent behavior in church prior to Mass, including cellphone use. As part of your response, you stated that cellphone use is always inappropriate. Judging behavior is also ugly behavior, at least as repugnant as irreverence.

    I use my cellphone prior to Mass while seated in church. I read the day’s Scriptures along with meditations on those readings from several sources. (I particularly like the daily reflections from the University of Notre Dame and from the Jesuit community.)

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    Carville.pdf

    A truck for Liberia mission

    President Donald Trump has said that he was elected to care for the needs of Pittsburgh, not Paris. America should come first, before we do anything for the planet or the advantage of poor countries. That seems to make sense to many Americans today. At the end of May I was visiting former classmates in Detroit. They took me on a tour of the city which I had not seen in 40 years. Downtown Detroit is still intact, a little worn, but still looking like the prosperous city

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    Doyle.pdf

    Sunday Mass obligation/New luminous mystery?

    Q In the Bible, Jesus says: “Do this in memory of me.” But he doesn’t say that it has to be done every Sunday and holy day. So many young people are falling away from the church because of its rigidity.

    Please explain why we are obligated. (Cedar Rapids, Iowa)

    A The responsibility to gather on Sundays for the Eucharist has been recognized by Christians since the earliest days of

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    Rolheiser.pdf

    Mourning our barrenness

    Several years ago, while teaching a summer course at Seattle University, I had as one of my students, a woman who, while happily married, was unable to conceive a child. She had no illusions about what this meant for her. It bothered her a great deal. She found Mother’s Day very difficult. Among other things, she wrote a well-researched thesis on the concept of barrenness in Scripture and developed a retreat on that same theme which she offered at various renewal centers.

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    Carville.pdf

    Prayer as a spiritual work of mercy

    The seventh and final spiritual work of mercy is “Pray for the living and the dead.” St. Faustina, the patron saint of mercy, commented, “If I cannot show mercy by deeds, I can always do so by prayer. My prayer reaches out even there where I cannot reach out physically.” And prayer works. It is a spontaneous response when good things happen to those whom we love as well as when hardship or suffering strikes them. Prayer creates a solidarity between us who pray and those for whom

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